Can burdock root, nettles leaf, parsley leaf & stem elevate blood pressure?

Planet Herbs Discussion Board: FOUNDATION: Can burdock root, nettles leaf, parsley leaf & stem elevate blood pressure?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Carnagey on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 03:10 am:

Actually, Rachel, this could be dose related. I do get a very small dose of burdock root in an Essaic tea that I take on nearly a daily basis. The tea includes four herbs (in addition to burdock root, slippery elm bark, sheep sorrel, and Indian rhubarb root) and it works out to a very small dose of any one herb. It is possible, I suppose that the little bit of burdock root I added in this "experiment" put me over the top. Or, possibly, the additional burdock root, nettles leaf, or parsley are interacting with the other three herbs in Eassaic. It just seemed strange that BP was so well managed before adding the three herbs for this course project.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By TracyR on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 06:28 pm:

Fascinating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rachel Westfall on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 10:24 am:

Perhaps it is dose-related. A lot of herbs have one effect at a lower dose, and the opposite effect at a higher dose. I don't know if this is the case here. Might you be using more of the herbs in combination than you would use if just eating one?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Carnagey on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 05:37 am:

Actually, I have used all three herbs individually for years and never had this reaction. That's why I was wondering if when combined there is some synergestic action. However, I have been unable to find any such reference in the literature. The cause and effect relationship seems pretty clear with me. I cannot identify any other lifestyle change during this experiment that would account for the rise. I have continued using the individual herbs with no untoward effects. So, perhaps, there is just something unique to my constitution that "rebels" when the three are combined. Who would have thought?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rachel Westfall on Saturday, February 18, 2006 - 06:53 pm:

This is really interesting. Both nettle and parsley should be hypotensive. Have you tried using each herb individually, to see what happens?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Carnagey on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 05:39 pm:

For the Lesson 3 essay question, I had a bit of a challenge because I already incorporate quite a number of local herbs as foods. Herbs are included in virtually every meal or beverage that enters my mouth. Nonetheless, for the essay question, I elected to add a bit of local burdock root, parsley, and nettles leaf into my foods. I selected these three herbs largely because they were three locally available herbs that I was not routinely using as foods in my diet. Also, I thought that the diuretic properties of the three herbs might be beneficial for chronic high blood pressure issues. I received just the oppposite results and thought that this might be a good topic for discussion with the foundation forum.

For nearly a year, I have been keeping my blood pressure under complete control with daily doses of garlic and ginger root. However, soon after adding the burdock root, parsley (leaves and stems), and nettles leaf to my foods for this essay question, I noted my blood pressure starting to rise (diastolic and systolic). I kept with this diet regimen for a few more days to give benefit of the doubt. However, blood pressure continued to rise. I stopped taking the three herbs for a few days and my blood pressure resumed to normal levels. Again, I tried the three herbs and within a few days my blood pressure started rising again. I have stopped entirely pending some feedback from forum members. I would have thought that, if anything, the diuretic properties of the three herbs would be beneficial for issues with high blood pressure. I have found nothing in the literature to suggest that any of these three herbs would cause a rise in blood pressure. I am wondering if anyone has thoughts here. Could there be some synergistic action from combining the three herbs that would cause the rise when individually they might not?