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In Search of Figgy Treats

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We've got two fig trees: one a black mission and one a green fig. The black mission we call, "Walking Fig," because it's been transplanted so many places and seems to like it. Both are prolific, although this year the weather caused late development of the fruit.

The black ones are mostly either gone, or are still hanging on the tree, too small and hard they are my favorites, though. The best recipe I've ever tasted for black figs was one I discovered this summer from a caterer at a music festival event. Here it is:

Quarter the fig from the top down to nearly the bottom and stuff with blue cheese (try gorgonzola!) and a walnut (pecans work well, too). Simple, elegant, delicious.

As for green figs, there only seem to be a few, traditional recipes -- either in sauce for meat, or wrapped with proscuitto. However, I recently learned a new one and it was fabulous. Here it is for you to enjoy:

Quarter figs as above and bake 20 minutes at 350 degrees. In the meantime, mix 1 Tblsp ricotta with 1 Tblsp cream per fig and pour over the baked fig. This is the "savory" version, although to me figs are quite sweet by themselves. Of course you can add a sweetener and it's even been suggested to top with shaved chocolate. Go figgy wild!

An Italian friend shared his favorite recipe with me after I told him about the two above. It takes a bit more preparation, but is worth it:

Quarter the figs as above. Steam asparagus, cut into smaller pieces and slice each in half. Marinate the asparagus in olive oil, lemon and balsamic vinegar, then stuff into figs (adding sun-dried tomatoes, if desired) and toothpick a slice of prosciutto around each. Voila!

These are my recipes so far -- without going online, that is.

What is your favorite fig recipe?

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